Five reasons why starting up a business is easier than you think

Are you considering starting your own business? Our guest blogger, Helena Stone, explains why it’s not as difficult as you might think.

Whether your bank account, sense of achievement – or both – need a top-up, you may find yourself ready to hop back on the work wagon. But possibly circumstances have changed and a 9-5 isn’t right for your lifestyle anymore.

This is when many women begin considering alternatives to returning to employment, such as starting up on their own.

The catalyst for me to go it alone was the loss of my brother. It made me re-evaluate my priorities. I realised that though I loved the excitement and challenge of my work, I wanted more family time, flexibility and a greater ability to grow.

I know it can feel like a big step and we can waste a lot of time talking ourselves out of taking the plunge.

So, here are five reasons why going it alone isn’t as difficult as you might believe:

1. Your experience as an employee counts. A lot!

Don’t think of yourself as starting from zero.

I spent twenty years in HR and change management. I specialised in these fields when I started my business but I drew on my experiences of delivering a service, people development and public speaking to expand my offering as a change management consultant, confidence expert and speaker.

That’s not to say your business idea has to be related to your previous career – far from it. Maybe you’ve got a burning passion that you’ve always wanted to turn into a job. Now’s the time!

Whatever your work history, so much that you’ve learnt as an employee is transferable – relationship building, leadership, crisis management. Draw on your bank of knowledge.

And don’t disregard the skills you’ve picked up during your career break.

Raising children, for example, tests your talents for logistics, listening, time management and multi-tasking…not to mention patience…

2. Perfection isn’t necessary …and actually, it’s not realistic.

As the slogan goes, “just do it”. If you put off setting up your business until everything is just right, you’ll never start.

What worked for me (and still does!) is taking daily action. Focusing on progress, not instant wins.

I’m a big believer in finding your ‘zone of genius’. It’s taken trial and error for me to uncover what really works but it’s meant my business and I have evolved and grown stronger.

Sounds like a corny reality show line but it really is all about the journey.

3. You can just be you

Some of us feel at home in a traditional office role and thrive in a world of structure, suits and management. For others, it’s a little restrictive. And some like a bit of both.

Whichever camp you fall into, creating your own business gives you the freedom to just be yourself. Want to set your own fabulous, funky dress code? Knock yourself out. Bit of a mad cat lady at heart? Perfect. Throw all that into the mix.

People buy from people they like. Combine professionalism with being authentically you and you’ll naturally make human connections – a crucial part of your sales pitch.

4. You can start up on a shoestring
 
Investing in your business is important but you certainly don’t need big bucks from the off.

In fact, in most cases, all you need is a laptop and phone.

Plus, there are numerous free on and offline support groups of like-minded people, willing to trade skills and help each other out. And really milk social media for all its worth! It’s not only a great free publicity tool but I find it brilliant for researching clients and testing the best ways to engage with them.

If you do have budget to begin with, a mentor or coach is an investment that will pay dividends. They’ll offer invaluable guidance, give the benefit of their experience and help provide focus and clarity.

5. You’ve got it in you…you just might not realise

Starting a business is scary especially if you’ve also had a lengthy period away from employment.

It takes resilience. But this is something you can work on.

Rather than being knocked back when something goes wrong, reframe how you view the situation. Focus on the positives – what have you learnt? What could you do differently next time?

Take a breather and clear your head. But don’t dwell on it or allow it to defeat you.

Bouncebackability builds resilience (plus it’s a great word). After all, think of all the famous entrepreneurs you know of – I’ll bet you can’t name one who didn’t overcome numerous hurdles to get where they are today.

 

Helena Stone is a change management consultant with a background in senior HR roles spanning 20 years. She works with organisations to increase productivity, efficiency and value in their business. 

She also delivers workshops on confidence and empowering women in the workplace. www.helenastoneconsultancy.com


Sign up to our free Women Returners network for more advice, support and job opportunities.

You’ll find much more help and advice on our website.

 

Ten Tips for Starting Up A Home Business

When we spoke at a recent back to work event, we listened to Debbie Blott,
Founder of The DecorCafe HomeBizClub, talk about how to start a home business. We’ve invited Debbie to share her advice for women who are interested in starting their own home business as a route back into work
after a career break.

1. Be Authentic: Taking a career break offers an opportunity
to rethink what you do. The most successful start-ups are founded on passion.
Knowledge builds confidence and confidence attracts customers.

Sarah Betteley, co-founder of Fruits of The Fridge, took the
opportunity of her career break to change from working as a lawyer to creating
catering company Fruits of The Fridge. Passionate about providing good
wholesome home cooked food she has built her business on her own way of life,
as someone who thinks nothing of putting together and packing up a complete menu of delicious food for a week’s holiday. (see Fruits of the Fridge).
2. Create Your Vision: Be realistic about what it is you
want to achieve and how much time you have to give. Is it a business to give
you an interest alongside caring for your family or do you want to grow and
sell a multi-million pound business?
3. Choose the most appropriate business structure: Setting
up as a sole trader is quick and easy. Creating a limited company separates
your personal and professional identities and protects you by limiting your
financial exposure to your business investment.
4. Set Simple Goals: It is easy to be immobilised by
planning and re-planning. Once you have decided what you want to achieve, set
achievable goals and an action list. Review regularly as you progress.
Jane Michell, founder of the UK’s leading delivery diet,
Jane Plan knows what it is like to struggle with your weight and initially
trained as nutritionist to build her skills. She describes herself
first and foremost as a mother of three children rather than a qualified business woman. She didn’t start with a complex business,
rather she had a clear vision and some simple goals and progressed step by step. Following her passion
to help her clients lose weight and transform their lives she has grown her
business, from preparing weekly diets for friends from around her SW London
kitchen table to more than £4 million in just 4 years. (see Jane Plan).
5. Make Space at Home: The lines between home and work can
blur. Put a structure in place to ensure that you can close the door on work,
ideally literally.
6. Build Your Brand: For many people working from home, your
brand is you. Ask yourself what is distinct about what you do and your values
and communicate it clearly and consistently.

Virginie Dunne worked as a
nurse, but had to stop when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. When she
began to recover she decided to retrain as a lighting designer to quite
literally share her joy and shed some light and so she named her company,
Splash of Light. (see Splash of Light).
7. Become an Authority: The most effective way to market
your business is to become an authority. Build strategic partnerships with
complementary businesses, write relevant articles for press, get involved in
local online forums and spread the word through social media.
8. Seek Support: You may miss the water-cooler conversations
in the office but you are not alone. Join local networks and you will find many
like-minded people who collaborate and help each other. Employing a business
coach or mentor provides valuable extra support in the early years. Join
networking organisations of like-minded people.
9. Stay Legal and Protect Your Ideas: Don’t forget to tell
the tax people that you have set up! The law is on your side and can help you to
protect your ideas and business if you put confidentiality agreements,
contracts and trademarks in place.
10. Get started! There is only one way to find out just what
you can do and you will learn quickly. Good luck!


About The DecorCafe HomeBizClub
Based in SW London The DecorCafe HomeBizClub is a
collaborative community of people starting up or running their own home
business. All about connecting, building skills and sharing ideas, they provide
ongoing inspiration and support to make building your
business more fun and less stressful. They welcome anybody who is interested to
come along to one of their sessions to find out more.
Posted By Donna